Food safety, traceability and sustainability blog

IPC/Subway® Talks Traceability and Blockchain at Upcoming Food Industry Events

Lucelena Angarita, Director of Supply Chain Traceability at IPC/Subway®, will present at upcoming National Restaurant Association (NRA) events on the value of traceability and how it can mitigate risks, both for the consumer and for the business brand.

True farm-to-fork traceability has many benefits for stakeholders throughout the food supply chain, from the grower, to the distribution center, the retailer, restaurant, and ultimately, the consumer.  It’s also a key component of blockchain, an emerging technology that has gained worldwide interest because of its potential to solve a variety of business problems.  A by-product of the discussion around blockchain is the awareness of the need for companies to automate their recordkeeping and traceability systems and to eliminate the manual, often paper-based processes that slow down traceability.

Buy-In and Budgeting for Food Safety and Traceability Software


Budgeting for new initiatives can often be challenging. This is true for food safety and traceability software, even as the consequences and long-term impact of not acting now are greater than ever.

Join FoodLogiQ for a live demo on Tuesday, October 30th, 2018 at 2:00 pm ET and learn how you can make the case for food safety and traceability software and get C-Suite buy-in.

FoodLogiQ Strengthens Reputation as Blockchain Pioneer

“Blockchain is new territory for many organizations, and they want solid guidance and best practices on how to navigate this fast-growing technology,” says Jamie Duke, FoodLogiQ CEO.  “We’re here to give it to them.”

FoodLogiQ, the leading SaaS provider of traceability, food safety and supply chain transparency solutions, today announced it will present at Blockchain East Summit + Trade Show in New York City on October 10, 2018, alongside multinational, protein-focused food company Tyson Foods and biotechnology authority AgBiome Innovations.  Together, the companies will serve on a panel discussion addressing the topic of blockchain and how it is being used in the food and beverage supply chain.

Learning from Hurricane Florence: Managing Food Supply Chain Disruptions

Disruptions, especially those caused by variables beyond our control, are bound to occur in the food supply chain. These include political upheavals, economic meltdowns and natural disasters. Hurricane Florence recently swept through North Carolina, the location of our main office, leaving in its wake billions worth of damaged property and infrastructure. Agricultural losses are estimated at $1 billion dollars. For anyone in the food industry, it's a not-so-gentle reminder of the often powerful impact of supply chain disruptions.

Food Fraud: Reducing the Risks and Ensuring Food Safety

Food fraud is a rising concern in the food industry.  The deliberate substitution, addition, tampering, or misrepresentation of food for financial gain defines food fraud. The Grocery Manufacturers Association estimates loss between $10 to $15 billion to food fraud each year. As the food supply chain becomes more complex and global, the possibility of encountering food fraud along the chain increases. Unfortunately, detecting and tracing cases of food fraud to the root sources becomes tougher.

Recall Readiness E-book

Food Safety & Traceability Software Buyer's Guide

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The Fact, Fiction and Future of Blockchain with FoodLogiQ

Traceability Consumer Survey

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