Food safety, traceability and sustainability blog

Food Safety Education: Why Public & Private Partners Should Work Together


Producing and delivering safe, nutritious food is a global challenge that affects every country in the world. It is also one that requires the contribution of food companies of all sizes as well as public and private partners. With the increasing demands for product variety and more sustainable food options, we are witnessing an era of complex supply chains, usually involving several large and small suppliers, both local and overseas. The implication is this: to ensure the production of safe food, all companies will need to understand their role in food safety and ensure compliance with the regulations.

Food Safety in Schools and Hospitals


Schools and hospitals are two of the most valuable institutions in any country, and the health and wellness of the people they serve is critically important. Children, especially those under the age of five, are more susceptible to foodborne illnesses due to their immature immune system, while hospital patients are also at a higher risk of contracting foodborne diseases because of their lowered immune systems. Therefore, maintaining the highest possible standards of food safety in schools and hospital cafeterias is a priority.

Minimizing Damage from FoodBorne Disease Outbreaks


Suppose you are alerted to the news of a foodborne disease outbreak, and as you scan through the details, you get even more shocking news: the outbreak has been linked to one of your products! This is arguably a manufacturer’s worst nightmare. According to a study from researchers at John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, a single foodborne disease outbreak at a fast-casual establishment could cost between $6,330 to $2.1 million in lost revenue, fines and lawsuits. And this is only on the financial side.

Food Safety in Frozen and Ready-to-Eat Foods


Food recalls are on the rise, and while some argue that the higher numbers may be due to improved reporting, it remains undisputed that the increased number of major outbreaks is alarming. Bacterial contamination is the leading cause of recalls, accounting for 44.1 percent of all cases, according to Stericycle. Among pathogenic bacteria, Listeria is one of the deadliest and most problematic organisms encountered in the industry. Listeria causes 28 percent of food-related deaths, second only to Salmonella, which causes 31 percent of deaths.

The Produce Safety Rule: Preparing for Routine FDA Inspections


We all know that 2018 was not a great year for farmers and growers in the United States. From romaine lettuce to pre-cut melons, we witnessed several foodborne disease outbreaks linked to the produce industry, triggering huge nationwide recalls. At least 800 people were sickened or hospitalized from multiple E. coli  outbreaks linked to romaine lettuce alone.

For farmers and regulators, reducing the number of food safety incidents remains a priority. If you operate a business that grows and sells fresh produce (fruits and vegetables), you should ensure your business complies with the provisions of the  Produce Safety rule for which FDA inspections start in Spring 2019.

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